Agenda Académica
Workshop académicos

Fecha: 8 de enero de 2018, 10:45, sala P 307, Facultad de Economía y Negocios


Administrative Distance and the Agency Problem: The Impact of Information Frictions in Foreign Direct Investment
Expositor: Gregory Sabin, senior lecturer Boston University’s Questrom School of Business

 
Does Mercy Bear Richer Fruits than Strict Justice? Implicit Effects of Subjective Rewards and Penalties in Tournaments

Fecha: 9 de enero de 2018, 10:45, sala P 307, Facultad de Economía y Negocios


Does Mercy Bear Richer Fruits than Strict Justice? Implicit Effects of Subjective Rewards and Penalties in Tournaments
Expositora: Susanna Gallani, Assistant professor, Harvard Business School

 
Clase con metodología de caso

Fecha: 9 de enero de 2018, 18:30, auditorio PwC, Facultad de Economía y Negocios


Clase con metodología de caso
Expositores: Susanna Gallani, Assistant professor, Harvard Business School, y Gregory Sabin, senior lecturer Boston University’s Questrom School of Business

 
Workshop “Incentives and Motivation: How Much Does Money Matter?

8 de enero de 2018, 18:30, auditorio PwC, Facultad de Economía y Negocios


Workshop “Incentives and Motivation: How Much Does Money Matter?
Expositores: Susanna Gallani, Assistant professor, Harvard Business School, y Gregory Sabin, senior lecturer Boston University’s Questrom School of Business

 
Seminario Interno FEN - Universidad de Chile

27 de diciembre de 2017, 13:00 horas, sala T-504, Facultad de Economía y Negocios


1-Título: Neurocognitive Sources of Misperception of Feedbacks in Managerial Decisions
Autores: Juan Pablo Torres y René San Martin


Abstract:
This article explores some cognitive sources of misperception of feedback in dynamic environments. Operational Research and Management Science (ORMS) literature has highlighted two key failures, which explain misperception of feedback: Stock-flow failure and failure to account for time delays. We develop a cognitive neuroscience experiment based on the traditional beergame to understand how the brain processes the stock and flow signals. We recorded and analysed brain electrical responses to the presentation of stock and flow information in an adapted version of the classical beer game. Our preliminary results suggest that, neurally, participants process stock and flow information differently in terms of their recruitment of both attentional and reward-processing circuits in the brain. We discuss how this might be a source of misperception of feedback.


 
<< Inicio < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Próximo > Fin >>

Página 10 de 23